Airbus A300 plane crashes

Other Airbus Models: A310, A320 , A330, A340, A380

The following numbered events involve the death of at least one airline passenger where the aircraft flight had a direct or indirect role, and where at least one of the dead passengers was not a stowaway, hijacker, or saboteur. The events that are not numbered are listed because they meet the criteria of a significant event as defined by AirSafe.com

  1. 27 June 1976; Air France A300; Entebbe, Uganda: Aircraft was hijacked and all aboard taken hostage. Some passengers were released shortly after the hijacking and the remainder were taken to Entebbe, Uganda. The remaining hostages were eventually rescued in a commando raid. About seven of the 258 passengers were killed.

  2. 3 July 1988; Iranair A300B2-203; Persian Gulf, near Straits of Hormuz: Aircraft was shot down by a surface to air missile from the American naval vessel U.S.S. Vincennes. All 16 crew and 274 passengers were killed.

  3. 28 September 1992; Pakistan International Airlines A300B4-203; near Katmandu, Nepal: The crew was flying the aircraft was flying an approach about 1300 feet (400 meters) lower than planned when the aircraft collided with high ground. The event happened in daylight and with cloud shrouding the mountains. All 12 crew and 155 passengers were killed

  4. 26 April 1994; China Airlines A300B4-622R; Nagoya, Japan: Crew errors led to the aircraft stalling and crashing during approach. All 15 crew and 249 of the 264 passengers were killed.

  5. 24 December 1994; Air France A300; Algiers Airport, Algeria: Hijackers killed 3 of the 267 passengers. Later, commandos retook the aircraft and killed four hijackers.

  6. 26 September 1997; Garuda Indonesia Airways A300B4-220; near Medan, Indonesia: The aircraft was on approach to Medan on a flight from Jakarta when it crashed in a mountainous area about 19 miles (30 km) from the airport. Extensive smoke and haze from numerous forest fires caused reduced visibility in the area. All 12 crew members and 222 passengers were killed.

  7. 16 February 1998; China Airlines A300-622R; flight 676; near Taipei, Taiwan: The aircraft crashed into a residential area short of the runway during its second landing attempt. The scheduled flight had been inbound from the island of Bali in Indonesia. The event occurred under conditions of darkness with rain and reduced visibility due to fog. All 15 crew and 182 passengers were killed. At least seven persons on the ground were also killed.

  8. 24 December 1999; Indian Airlines A300B2-101; near Katmandu, Nepal: The flight was hijacked shortly after takeoff. The hijackers killed one of the 173 passengers, but none of the 11 crew members.

  9. 12 November 2001; American Airlines A300-605R; flight 587; Queens, New York: The aircraft was on a flight from New York to Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic when it crashed into a residential neighborhood just outside JFK airport. The aircraft experienced an in-flight breakup, with the vertical fin and one engine landing away from the main impact site. The crash damaged or destroyed several homes, and killed five people on the ground. Also killed were all nine crew members and 251 passengers on the aircraft, including five infants.
    Wikipedia entry about this event
    American Airlines plane crashes

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/American_Airlines_Flight_587

    13 April 2010; Aerounion A300B4-203F; XA-TUE; flight 302; Monterrey, Mexico: The aircraft was on a domestic cargo flight from Mexico City to Monterrey, Mexico and was destroyed when it crashed on a roadway about two kilometers from the destination airport. All five crew members were killed, as were two people on the ground.
    While this airliner accident resulted in fatalities, it is not counted as a fatal event as defined by AirSafe.com

    14 August 2013; UPS A300F4-622R; N155UP; flight 1354; Birmingham, AL: The aircraft was on a domestic cargo flight from Louisville, KY (SDF) to Birmingham, AL (BHM), crashed and burned during a landing attempt. The aircraft was destroyed in the crash and subsequent fire, and both pilots were killed. There were no other occupants, and no one was killed or injured on the ground. While this plane crash resulted in several fatalities, it is not a fatal event as defined by AirSafe.com.
    Additional details on the crash
    Other A300 plane crashes

Related information
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Accidents by model

Airbus A300 plane crashes
http://airsafe.com/events/models/a300.htm -- Revised: 28 September 2014