Fatal Plane Crashes and Significant
Events for the Boeing 767

Other Boeing Models: 717, 727, 737, 747, 757, 767, 777

The following events are those involving at least one passenger death on a 767 where the aircraft flight had a direct or indirect role. Excluded would be events where the only passengers killed were stowaways, hijackers, or saboteurs. Excluded would be events where the only passengers killed were stowaways, hijackers, or saboteurs. The passenger fatalities in the numbered events may be due to accidents, hijackings, sabotage, or military action. The events that are not numbered may or may not include fatalities, and are included because they meet the criteria of a significant event as defined by AirSafe.com

    23 July 1983; Air Canada 767; Flight 143; near Gimli, Manitoba: The aircraft was on a scheduled domestic flight from Montreal, QC to Edmonton, AB. The aircraft was cruising at about 41,000 feet when the engines shut down due to fuel exhaustion. The crew was able to glide to an emergency landing at a nearby former military airfield. Due to problems with fuel quantity indication system, the crew used an alternate procedure to estimate the fuel load. There were no serious injuries among the eight crew members and 61 passengers. Due to the use of an incorrect conversion factor, the crew had miscalculated the weight of fuel on board and had less than half of the expected weight of fuel on board.
    Fatal Air Canada Events
    Wikipedia Entry for this Event

    31 March 1986; United Air Lines 767-200; San Francisco, CA: The engines were inadvertently deactivated the engines during climb at about 3,000 feet. The crew was able to restart the engines and returned to the departure airport.
    NTSB Incident Report

    30 June 1987; Delta Air Lines 767-200; Los Angeles, CA: The engines were inadvertently shut off during climb at about 2,000 feet. The crew was able to restart the engines at about 500 feet and continued to their original destination of Cincinnati.

  1. 26 May 1991; Lauda Air 767-300ER; Suphan Buri Province, Thailand: Aircraft lost control and crashed after an uncommanded deployment of a thrust reverser during climb. All 10 crew and 213 passengers were killed.

  2. 23 November 1996; Ethiopian Airlines 767-200ER; near Moroni, Comoros Islands: The aircraft was on a flight from Ethiopia to Kenya when it was hijacked by at least two people. While attempting a landing near Moroni in the Comoros Islands the aircraft ran out of fuel and ditched near a beach. Ten of the 12 crew members and 117 of the 160 passengers were killed. The three hijackers apparently died.
    Information on other ditching events

  3. 31 October 1999; EgyptAir 767-300ER; Atlantic Ocean near Nantucket Island, MA: Radar and radio contact with the aircraft was lost shortly after the aircraft departed JFK Airport in New York on a flight to Cairo. The aircraft crashed into the ocean about 60 miles (96 km) south of Nantucket Island. The NTSB determined that the aircraft departed from controlled flight and crashed into the Atlantic Ocean as a result of flight control inputs by the first officer. All 14 crew members and 203 passengers were killed.
    NTSB Accident Synopsis
    NTSB Accident Report
    Additional NTSB Background Information

    4 March 2001; United Air Lines 767; near Kona, HI: While early reports indicated that this 767 had a complete loss of power in both engines, the analysis of the flight data recorder by the NTSB does not support this conclusion. According to early FAA and media reports, United Flight 42 took off from Kahului on the Hawaiian island of Maui on a flight to Los Angeles and experienced a dual-engine shutdown about 70 miles (112 km) into the flight, followed by an in-flight restart and a diversion to the Kona airport. Later analysis of the flight data recorder by the NTSB showed that both engines had a reduction of power to below idle, but did not show any evidence of a complete loss of power in either engine. However, there was roughly a 30-second gap in the data during the time when the engines were operating at reduced power.
    Fatal 767 Events

  4. 11 September 2001; American Airlines 767 (Flight 11); World Trade Center, New York: The aircraft was on a flight from Boston to Los Angeles when it was hijacked and flown into one of the World Trade Center Towers. Another jet, a United Airlines 767, was hijacked and crashed into the other tower. Both towers later collapsed. All 11 crew members, 76 passengers, and five hijackers were killed, as were untold numbers of people on the ground.
    Fatal American Airlines Events
    Attack on New York and Washington

  5. 11 September 2001; United Airlines 767; Flight 175; World Trade Center, New York: The aircraft was on a scheduled domestic flight from Boston to Los Angeles when it was hijacked and flown into one of the World Trade Center Towers. Another jet, an American Airlines 767, was hijacked and crashed into the other tower. Both towers later collapsed. All nine crew members, 51 passengers, and five hijackers were killed, as were nearly 3,000 people on the ground.
    Attack on New York and Washington
    Wikipedia Entry for this Event

  6. 15 April 2002; Air China 767-300ER; near Pusan, South Korea: The aircraft was on a scheduled international flight from Beijing, China to Pusan, South Korea. The crew was attempting a second approach under conditions of reduced visibility, and crashed into a mountain about 2.5 nm (4.6 km) from the runway. Eight of the 11 crew members and 121 of the 155 passengers were killed.
    Fatal Air China Events
    Fatal Events for Airlines of Asia

Fatal Events by Model
Fatal Event Rates by Model
Accidents by Model

Fatal Plane Crashes and Significant Events for the Boeing 767
http://www.airsafe.com/events/models/b767.htm -- Revised: 28 February 2009